top of page

Grupo de Análise de Mercado

Público·92 membros
Carter Walker
Carter Walker

Friday The 13th Part 2


Friday the 13th Part 2, marketed as Friday the 13th Part II, is a 1981 slasher film and was the second sequel to the smash hit original. It was the directorial debut of Steve Miner, who would also helm the next installment in the series, 1982's Friday the 13th Part III. The screenplay was written by Ron Kurz.




Friday The 13th Part 2



That night, Ginny, Paul, Ted, and the rest of the Counselors decide to go into town for one last party at Casino Bar. Mark, Vickie, Terry, and Scott decide to stay back at the camp, Jeff and Sandra are forced to stay back at the camp (as punishment by Paul for them sneaking off to Camp Crystal Lake earlier in the film) and Jason comes in and murders the remaining counselors one by one. First, Terry goes skinny-dipping and chases Scott into the woods when he steals her clothes. Scott is caught in a snare in a tree and Terry goes back to her cabin to get a knife to cut Scott down. While waiting for Terry to return, Jason slashes Scott's throat with a machete. Terry comes back to Scott with a knife to find him dead. She attempts to flee, but is murdered as well. Mark and Vickie decide to sleep together that night, and Vickie goes to freshen up. Jeff and Sandra go upstairs and have sex. While waiting for Vickie, Mark rolls out onto the porch in his wheelchair, and is killed by Jason, who buries a machete in his face and Mark goes rolling down a flight of stairs backward in his wheelchair. Jason then enters the main lodge, grabs Ted's spear, and heads upstairs to a lovemaking Jeff and Sandra.


Jeff and Sandra are about to finish, when Jason barges in the room and impales them both with the spear, which penetrates them and then on through the bed and into the floor - in the future, this prompts Rob Dier (Sandra's older brother, who appears in Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter) to seek revenge against Jason. Vickie returns and goes upstairs to investigate, but only finds Jeff and Sandra dead and Jason, who now is shown, clad in a burlap sack over his head and overalls. Jason slashes Vickie's right leg with a butcher knife and corners her, then stabs her in the stomach. Ginny and Paul leave a very drunk Ted behind and arrive back at the camp. Upon entering the main cabin, they find it dark and empty. They find blood everywhere upstairs and soon after, Jason, wielding a pitchfork, attacks Paul and Ginny. Paul is knocked unconscious and Ginny is attacked. First, Ginny hides in a bathroom, and attempts to escape through a window, but Jason appears outside and grabs at her. Ginny runs into the kitchen, finds Crazy Ralph's corpse in the pantry and escapes the lodge. With her car unable to start, Ginny is chased across the camp by Jason. She hides under a bed inside another cabin, but sees a rat and urinates in panic. Through this, Jason finds her, but she manages to salvage a chainsaw and wounds his right arm, then as Jason recovers, she smashes a chair across his back, and he is rendered unconscious.


In one scene where Daskawisz was wearing the burlap flour sack, part of the flour sack was flapping at his eye, so the crew used tape inside the eye area to prevent it from flapping. Daskawisz received rug burns around his eye from the tape from wearing the rough flour sack material for hours. The use of the sack hood was similar to the 1976 film The Town That Dreaded Sundown.


Like its predecessor, Friday the 13th Part 2 had difficulty receiving an R rating from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). Upon reviewing the film, the Classification and Rating Administration (CARA) warned Paul Hagger, an executive at Paramount, that the "accumulation of violence throughout the film" may still lead to an X rating even if substantial cuts were made.A total of forty-eight seconds had to be cut from the film in order to avoid an X rating. Most noted by censors was the murder scene of Jeff and Sandra, who are impaled by a spear while having sex in a bed (a scene many have compared to a scene in Mario Bava's A Bay of Blood), which the censors found particularly graphic.


Friday the 13th Part 2[a] is a 1981 American slasher film produced and directed by Steve Miner in his directorial debut, and written by Ron Kurz. It is the sequel to Friday the 13th (1980), and the second installment in the franchise. Adrienne King, Betsy Palmer and Walt Gorney reprise their respective roles from the first film as Alice Hardy, Pamela Voorhees, and Crazy Ralph. Amy Steel and John Furey also star. Taking place five years after the first film, Part 2 follows a similar premise, with an unknown stalker killing a group of camp counselors at a training camp near Crystal Lake. The film marks the debut of Jason Voorhees as the series' main antagonist.


Originally, Friday the 13th Part 2 was intended to be an anthology film based on the Friday the 13th superstition. However, after the popularity of the original film's surprise ending, the filmmakers opted to continue the story and mythology surrounding Camp Crystal Lake, a trend that would be repeated in every film in the franchise.


Like the original film, Friday the 13th Part 2 faced opposition from the Motion Picture Association of America, who noted its "accumulative violence" as problematic, resulting in numerous cuts being made to allow an R rating. The film opened theatrically on May 1 in New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco on May 1, 1981.[5][6] Friday the 13th Part 2 received generally negative reviews, and was less financially successful than the first film, grossing $21.7 million in the U.S. on a budget of $1.25 million. A direct sequel, Friday the 13th Part III, was released one year later.


Two months after the murders at Camp Crystal Lake, sole survivor Alice Hardy is recovering from her traumatic experience. In her apartment, when Alice opens the refrigerator to get her cat some food, she finds the severed head of Pamela Voorhees and is murdered with an ice pick to her temple by an unknown intruder.


Adrienne King was pursued by an obsessed fan after the success of the original Friday the 13th and purportedly wished her role to be small as possible,[8] though in the documentary Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday the 13th, it was stated that King's agent had asked for a higher salary, which the studio could not afford.[9]


Principal photography took place from October 3 and finished in November 1980, and primarily occurred in New Preston and Kent, Connecticut.[12] Special effects artist Tom Savini was asked to work on the film but declined because he was already working on another project, Midnight (1982).[9] In addition, he was not receptive to the concept of Jason as the killer in the film. Savini was then replaced by Stan Winston. Winston, however, had a scheduling conflict and had to drop out of the project.[9] The make-up effects were ultimately handled by Carl Fullerton. Fullerton designed the "look" for the adult Jason Voorhees and went with long red hair and a beard while following the facial deformities established in the original film in the make-up designed by Tom Savini for Jason as a child. Fullerton's look for the adult Jason was abandoned in the sequel, Friday the 13th Part 3, despite the fact that the film took place the following day and was helmed by the same director, Steve Miner. Some fans have theorized that the sequence showing Jason with a beard and long hair reflects a "dream" rather than a reality because the following sequel picks up with the events showing his face having not happened, and therefore what was represented was Ginny's guess at what he looked like under the burlap sack rather than what he actually looked like, which would excuse the break in continuity.[13]


In one scene where Daskawisz was wearing the burlap flour sack, part of the flour sack was flapping at his eye, so the crew used tape inside the eye area to prevent it from flapping. Daskawisz received rug burns around his eye from the tape from wearing the rough flour sack material for hours.[15] The use of the sack hood was similar to the 1976 film The Town That Dreaded Sundown.[16]


Like its predecessor, Friday the 13th Part 2 had difficulty receiving an R rating from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).[18] Upon reviewing the film, the Classification and Rating Administration (CARA) warned Paul Hagger, an executive at Paramount, that the "accumulation of violence throughout the film" may still lead to an X rating even if substantial cuts were made.[19]


A total of forty-eight seconds had to be cut from the film in order to avoid an X rating.[9] This film received a deluxe DVD release in February 2009, but the edited footage was not included. Most noted by censors was the murder scene of Jeff and Sandra, who are impaled by a spear while having sex in a bed (a scene many have compared to a scene in Mario Bava's A Bay of Blood), which the censors found particularly graphic.[9][18] In September 2020, it was announced that the uncut footage had been located by Samuelson Studios and was included as an extra on the upcoming box set release from Scream Factory.[20]


After Paramount discovered actress Marta Kober was only 16, a scene showing her with full frontal nudity was completely deleted.[9] In September 2020, cult horror movie distributor Scream Factory announced in conjunction with Samuelson Studios that cut footage from the film, including Marta Kober's full frontal nude scene had been found on a VHS owned by FX artist Carl Fullerton, who had saved the footage for his own portfolio. Fullerton lent the VHS to Scream Factory, who included it on the Friday the 13th Blu-Ray Collection: Deluxe Edition, though it did not include Kober's underage nudity.


In 1982, Gramavision Records released an LP album of selected pieces of Harry Manfredini's scores from the first three Friday the 13th films.[21] On January 13, 2012, La-La Land Records released a limited edition 6-CD boxset containing Manfredini's scores from the first six films. It sold out in less than 24 hours.[22] Waxworks Records released the score, composed by Harry Manfredini, on vinyl in summer 2015.[23] 041b061a72


Informações

Bem-vindo ao grupo! Você pode se conectar com outros membros...

membros

  • Olesya Solonenkova
    Olesya Solonenkova
  • Kenshi Maluko
    Kenshi Maluko
  • Genkacku Hotinov
    Genkacku Hotinov
  • Alexandro Rolling
    Alexandro Rolling
Página do Grupo: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page